Questions and answers from the inclusion and accessibility event

Last month, Accessibility Manchester ran a series of inclusion and accessibility talks. The line-up of speakers mainly came from Co-op Digital and you can read a summary here. We pre-recorded the talks, added captions, then showed them across 3 lunch-time sessions. We collected questions from attendees so we could give written (accessible) answers afterwards.  

Here they are.  


1. How can teams test with real users if they can’t afford to pay for participant recruitment? 

If you’re tight on budget or have a business challenge on procurement, a good alternative is to find user research participants with access needs through related charities. (We’d still suggest making a contribution to the charity and reward the participants for their time, of course).  

Charities want to raise awareness and improve the lives of those they serve, and we’ve found that teams tend to get more than they expect in return – often not just feedback on their prototype or live site. We started doing usability research with visually impaired people through the Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB) – they helped us to identify issues on our website whilst also raising awareness of accessibility internally with colleagues. This turned out to be the catalyst for making accessibility a priority at Co-op.   

Related: our blog post What we considered before researching with people who are visually impaired

Paul Braddock, UX designer 

2. And how about affordable testing services for accessibility? 

We recommend manual testing, for example zoom into your web browser to 400% and navigate using your keyboard only. 

For automated testing use these plugins/extensions: 

Chris Gibbons, Lead Front-End engineer 

3. Are there tools that help test whether content design or written communication is accessible?  

Yes, we use the Hemmingway Editor which lets you know if: 

  • your content is difficult to read 
  • you’re using the passive rather than the active voice 
  • there’s a plainer English alternative to a word you’ve used 

There’s also Grammarly which is also free. However, we never rely on these tools. Another content designer or member of your team should always crit the content you create but the best way to test content accessibility is to put your content in front of users – preferably with a range of literacy levels.  

Related: Inclusive, accessible services: the importance of content design – a blog post from Joanne Schofield.   

4. Do you have any tips for managing an accessibility champions community in a large company? 

If you don’t already have a loosely-organised group of experts, get started by bringing together a group of people who are passionate about accessibility – being interested and being aware of the importance of inclusivity is the main thing at the beginning. Start small. 

At Co-op, our core team meet at least once a month. We set objectives that align to our accessibility policy and overarching vision: to make all Co-op products and services accessible for everyone.  

We’ve made some noise to raise awareness – we’ve held events, we’ve written blog posts, we created our accessibility policy – all of this stuff helps colleagues to embed accessibility into the culture of the organisation.  

As time goes on, you’ll notice that the group will naturally evolve and infiltrate the rest of an organisation. We also meet quarterly and often invite external speakers to join us to share their knowledge and experience. 

Paul Braddock, UX designer

5. When it comes to running experiments, how have you been able to balance the accessibility policy needs with creating a prototype to test a hypotheses at speed? 

We test for accessibility at various stages throughout the design process. When we test prototypes at the beginning, we can still test with people with access needs. I tend to test with users who use screen magnification as it is purely reliant on the design and the user interface rather than code. However, even when we have tested with people who use assistive technology such as voice activation, we still learn more about how they navigate as well as specific components they usually have issues with.  

When we conduct usability studies, we ask for 2 in 5 people to have an accessibility need such as learning difficulties or colour blindness. This also helps to ensure we are in line with our accessibility policy (for example, readability), but means we can still work at speed.  

The coding part of accessibility is tested when we have something in production. This allows us to test even further, doing our own automated, manual testing, whilst also using the resources of assisted tech users at Fable.  

Having an accessible design system also helps ensure we are adhering to our accessibility policy; and with Fable having a 2-day turnaround has really helped us work at speed without any delays on the project.  

Hannah Pass, Lead user researcher 

6. How is Co-op championing the accessibility guidelines laid out in the design system so that everyone from colleagues to third parties use them? 

It will take time before they are fully adopted both internally by colleagues and externally with people we work with. That said, we are asking all third parties we work with to follow our accessibility standards. The standards are one part of a set of measures we have created to begin changing the culture. We are also:  

  • running accessibility awareness training  
  • implementing our accessibility policy  
  • making sure all our communities of practice have diversity and inclusion objectives which involve accessibility  
  • creating our ‘Experience Library’ which will have lots of tools and guidance for accessibility 

All of this means shifting the mindset of the organisation to one where accessibility is always part of the conversation. 

7. How are you prioritising which accessibility issue that need fixing? 

We prioritise based on the biggest disruption to a user trying to use a service. We look at quantative and qualitative research to find out if an accessibility issue might stop someone carrying out the task they came to us to complete. Anything that prevented them continuing would be the first priority, and areas that caused confusion would come later – of course, we aim to address them all. 

I use a 3-point scale: 

  1. Prevented the user from continuing. 
  1. Blocked the user, but they found a workaround. 
  1. Caused confusion, but they managed to continue. 

Hannah Pass, Lead user researcher 

8. Amazing work on the web content accessibility guidelines. Have you shared your them and the thinking behind them with the Web Accessibility Initiative? 

We haven’t, no. It’s the first version of these simplified standards that we have done so we’d like to test them to see how they work and improve them. Since the talks last month, we’ve heard from a few people who are also trying to simplify these guidelines so perhaps we will try to approach WAI together. 

9. Can you share the Accessibility Testing framework that was shown during the talks? 

It’s not quite ready to be shared it yet but feel free to get in touch and we’ll be happy to talk more about it. You can also sign up for our design system updates.  

Chris Gibbons, Lead Front-End engineer 

10. Does Google Analytics offer an option to track user data of assistive technologies? If not, is there an appropriate a hack? For example, a large text setting or turning images off. 

GA doesn’t, and – to my knowledge – there’s no tracking software that does this as there could be too many potential issues arise. You could maybe target click events on hidden “skip-to-content” links to give some idea of usage, but sadly this isn’t an exact science. 

Chris Gibbons, Lead Front-End engineer 

11. I would like more UX experience – does Co-op take on interns? 

Keep an eye on our jobs page, follow us on Twitter and we sometimes have more detail on Digital jobs on the blog too. 

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