Developing visual design across Co-op products and services

The Co-op Digital Design team has recently started to work on products and services that give us the opportunity to develop our visual design. This post is about why that’s important for Co-op as an organisation, and what we’ve done so far.   

Familiarity across functional and visual design

Screen Shot 2019-06-16 at 11.05.40

The image shows the difference between functional and visual design. Guardian – our service which helps Co-op Funeralcare colleagues arrange funerals – falls very much under ‘practical need’, whereas the design for our digital offers for members appeals to people’s emotions.

Up until now, the aim of most of our work has been to give time back to colleagues so they can spend more time with customers and less time on admin. How do I, Guardian and Shifts are all examples of our functional, colleague-facing design work.

As we’ve progressed with that, we’ve created components and guidelines and we’ve begun documenting them in our design system. Although it’s still work in progress, teams throughout the Co-op now refer to and use the design system and as a result, we’re creating a much more unified experience when people interact with Co-op services in our different business areas.

However, more recently the Design team’s work has involved designing customer-facing products and services. When it comes to products and services like a convenience food store, customers have a choice about which one to use, and this is why engaging with them on a more emotional level is essential.

We’re now looking to create familiarity in a visual sense too.

‘Good’ visual design is hard to define

Appealing to a customer’s ‘emotional motivations’ means we want our designs to be pleasing to them aesthetically. But figuring out why something is pleasing is hard because ‘good’ is subjective.

Although there isn’t a formula for success, good visual design considers:  

  • imagery – using good quality imagery in the right place, at the right time gives hints, cues and can stimulate interest
  • typography – the number of type sizes and the contrast between them helps readability and reduces visual noise
  • colour – using it well emphasises content and helps create pace and visual interest
  • composition – where each element is placed and the space around it creates rhythm and hierarchies, and using plenty of white space improves readability
  • shape and pattern – can group or emphasise content, or add personality to layouts

Good design depends very much on context too. At the Co-op, with many different business areas to consider, creating familiarity so customers know what to expect is ‘good’ visual design. It makes our designs more accessible on a cognitive level and makes using our products and services enjoyable rather than disconnected and jarring.

Developing our visual design – our progress so far

We started by holding a workshop for Co-op Digital designers.

We stuck some of the visual design for the projects we’re working on up on the wall, plus the ideas put forward by Lucky Generals – the agency Co-op is working with. Seeing similarities and differences between everything in paper form was a starting point to discuss what works and what needs more work.

We sketched out and mocked up ideas related to anything we’d seen up on the wall – at this stage ideas didn’t have to relate to a specific product or service. 

photograph of the sketches from the first workshop with designers across Co-op Digital

Then we dot voted on which concepts we wanted to develop further.

The photo below show our visual exploration up on walls. The ideas are organised chronologically to show our progression.

3_walls

Involving stakeholders

At this point we had designs that were working well visually. They were bold and simple without being simplistic. When we had a collection of ideas we felt – after a little more development – had the potential to be rolled out, we invited stakeholders from Co-op Food, Insurance and Brand to come and see them.

We weren’t asking for new ideas, we were asking for feedback on the ones we’d curated. We asked for comments on post its.

photograph of colleagues from food, insurance and brand were asked to comment on the visual design exploration work

Applying new visual design elements to old work and new

Since then, designers across many projects and in many parts of the business have been starting to tweak – and in some cases overhaul – the visual design. Some of the examples below like the Co-op Health page and digital offers are live but others are mock ups.

Coop.co.uk homepage

The image below shows a possible new design of the coop.co.uk homepage. We’ve used cropped ‘squircles’ (square circles ;-p) to highlight and group content. (By Tony Carberry, Michael Chadwick, Gail Mellows, Sam Sheriston, Matt Tyas and Katherine Wastell). 

image shows possible new design of the coop.co.uk home page uses cropped 'squircles to highlight and group content.

Co-operate

The image below shows our visual exploration for the Co-operate platform which includes experimenting with hand drawn marks. (By Katrina Currie and Katherine Wastell).

screen shot of Visual exploration for the Co-operate platform includes experimenting with the use of hand drawn marks

Digital offers for members

The image below shows the new visual design for the offers service that went live 28 May. The service lets members choose and manage selected food offers digitally. Kyle Fyffe, Asher Khan and Louise Nicholas used colour playfully and when a member picks an offer, the interaction is animated.

7_offers

Co-op Health

The image below shows a live page on coop.co.uk which supports the Co-op Health app. The visual design balances functional design (download the app) and visual marketing-based content. Cropped squircles and part of the app badge form the background that content is layered on. (By Tom Adams, Michael Chadwick, Gail Mellows and Joanne Schofield).

8_health

‘It’s what we do’ page

The image below shows a new design for the ‘It’s what we do’ area on coop.co.uk which isn’t live yet. (By Tony Carberry, Michael Chadwick, Gail Mellows, Sam Sheriston, Matt Tyas and Katherine Wastell). 

9_whatwedo

Sustainability page

The image below shows a new design for one of the environment pages on coop.co.uk which isn’t live yet. (By Tony Carberry, Michael Chadwick, Gail Mellows, Sam Sheriston, Matt Tyas and Katherine Wastell). 

10_sustainability

Applying familiar design

We’ve made a really strong start but it’ll take time to understand how the visual design is working for our users in live products and services. Just as we do with our functional design, we’ll iterate and build on our direction. Once we know what works well, we’ll document it in our design system.

Gail Mellows
Lead visual designer

What we learnt from Jared Spool

On Tuesday eve, much of the design community from Co-op Digital and the wider north west attended User Research North’s event to hear Jared Spool’s talk.

Over the years, Jared’s influence and presence in the design world has been widely felt and acknowledged. He co-founded Center Centre, a school to train user experience designers and ultimately, Jared helps designers help their organisations deliver well-designed products and services. You can read more about his work here.  

We learnt a lot from him.

In this post, a handful of Co-op Digital colleagues reflect on what they learnt on Tuesday and how:

  • their new knowledge will help them with their current Co-op work
  • knowing this earlier would have helped with past work

Experience design: all the moments, all the gaps

My big take away from the talk was this quote:

When we think in terms of experience, we’re thinking of the entire flow: all of the gaps, all of the moments. That’s what we mean by experience design.

In Co-op Health, we’re providing a service for people who want to order their repeat prescription through our app. This is the front stage – the part the end user sees.

But the back stage of the service needs to be considered to fulfil that entire flow so every moment is accounted for. For example, when you order a prescription, this needs to talk to the NHS and the GP surgery. The prescription order then needs to be made and checked by a pharmacist before it’s picked up by the Royal Mail and delivered. All of those aspects of the service will impact the experience and service we’re providing for people.

Jared’s talk made me think even harder about the importance of collaboration, inclusivity and co-creation across teams and external organisation – it’s a good place to start to ensure the overall service is the best it can be with ‘moments of delight’ Jared mentioned.

Lucy Tallon, principal designer

Demonstrating difficulty is worthwhile

I loved this analogy from Jared. I’ll paraphrase:

A tightrope walker’s act is to walk up and down a rope in a circus. Realistically, keeping their balance and walking the length of the rope is easy for them – they can do it without any trouble. But, if their act appeared to be super easy, the audience is less likely to appreciate the tightrope walker’s skill because the difficulty in doing such a thing isn’t being amplified. The ‘act’ of ponderous steps and motioning a wobble every now and then, which in turn prompts a drum roll every time they do so, is meant to produce suspense and show how hard the task is.

We can learn from this circus act. We too can show the challenges of a design process.

What we do is hard, but to people whose expertise aren’t in design, most websites and apps seem easy. Working in the open; being transparent about how we make decisions and why we’ve made them; ensuring that we have a diverse set of people in the room helps everyone understand the process. Blog posts, week notes, putting our work on the wall, inviting feedback, seeking out stakeholders who haven’t been involved in the design and taking them on research are all things that help. The talk highlighted the importance of continuing to do these things.

Nate Langley, principal designer

Context is where design happens

Jared spoke about the importance of context when solving design decisions.

He showed examples where designers had made improvements to designs from other organisations that they had found particularly poor.

But, although the designs used user-centred design techniques and looked more appealing, they were not feasible in the context in which the organisations operated. The hardware the organisations used, the interconnectivity of their systems, the constraints of their tools and processes, rendered the suggested ‘improvements’ to designs almost impossible (and would cost far too much). As Jared said in a related blog post:

“Often when we see usability problems in designs, it’s because the design team didn’t know something about the context that they should have. Teams with a strong awareness of the different contexts that will crop up are more likely to produce designs that will consistently delight users.”

I’m working on the new Co-op Health app. The majority of the team are new to working within health. And, because we connect to NHS systems, there are a number of constraints that are out of our control.

Jared’s talk reminded me how valuable it is to get as many people involved in the research and design process as possible. Doing this not only allows us to understand the technical constraints and challenges that our designs must operate within, but diverse perspectives help us design for the different personal contexts of our users too. By understanding the challenges that we and our users are facing, we’re able to design solutions that meet both our operational goals and the needs of our users.

Joanne Schofield, lead content designer

From ‘unconsciously incompetent’ to ‘unconsciously competent’

I’m working on a Co-op Food project with people from across the organisation whose expertise are in many different disciplines.

Jared explained that everyone needs to be involved in the design process in order to deliver a successful service. He said that everyone is a designer – we’re just at different stages of the 4 stages of design understanding.

4 post it notes showing the progression of design understanding. far left - far right reads: unconscious incompetence, conscious incompetence, conscious competence, unconscious competence

Jared talked about how organisations sometimes use strategies or ‘plays’ (an American football analogy) to help teams improve their awareness.

It’s our job as designers to help people who don’t identify as designers move from being ‘unconsciously incompetent’ at design to being ‘consciously incompetent’. This highlighted the importance of exposing the wider team to journey maps; the concept of story mapping and involving them in user research so they see how people are using a service first-hand.

From now on, I’m going to start identifying activities in our playbook that Digital team members can use when we need to help colleagues jump between stages. Some ‘plays’ may not be effective, but that’s OK, we can try another until we’re all playing as one team in perfect formation.

James Rice, lead designer

Changing the behaviour of others… with our thoughts

Jared talked about an experiment where a group of rats were labelled as ‘smart’ or ‘dull’ and what people were told about the rats affected the result of the experiment. Sounds like nonsense, but I’ve seen this happen.

Screenshot_20190531_104922_com.instagram.android

This is down to something called the ‘expectancy bias’. Your expectations of people or a team will affect how they perform. If you go in believing someone is not a designer, and therefore not capable of creating good design, they won’t.

“Expectations can change outcomes,” Jared said. “Our expectations can change our team’s outcomes.”

I’ve noticed that when I go into something assuming the worst, whether it’s a stakeholder who I presume has bad intentions, or a team I think aren’t capable of making a good product, I tend to prove myself right. Now I try very hard to assume the best possible thing of people and, even if they have different motivations to me, they believe they’re doing the right thing.

I once worked on a product with a very inexperienced design team, and quickly got very concerned we couldn’t deliver the design. When I forced myself to think positively, I saw a significant change in the quality and output of our work, and we delivered.

Katherine Wastell, Head of Design

We’re always interested in hearing about great speakers and significant talks that have changed your way of thinking and working. Comment below.

Co-op health: running a design sprint across disciplines

Last week we launched an app that helps people view, order and manage their NHS repeat prescription from their phone. We want to make prescription ordering easy and convenient for people by providing self-service, simple collection and delivery options, and transparency throughout the process.

The app is very much a first version that we’ll continue to test with users and iterate on.

However, we think this is a good opportunity to talk about the work we did on a feature that we hope to add to the app soon.

Trying out a 5-day design sprint

As with many big, traditional organisations it can sometimes be difficult to move at pace within the Co-op. Design sprints can be useful to answer critical business questions quickly so we thought we’d give it a go. We got a group of designers, researchers, engineers, pharmacists, product managers as well as subject matter experts together for 5 consecutive days to build a realistic prototype. Having the relevant people in the room who could make decisions on behalf of their area of expertise was essential.

Design sprint: booking medical appointments

During the design sprint we were looking at how people book an appointment with a medical professional.

Together, we spent a day on each of the following tasks:

  1. Defining the challenge.
  2. Sketching ideas that might help us solve the challenge.
  3. Choosing an idea to take forward, then storyboarding it.
  4. Designing a prototype of the chosen idea.
  5. Putting the prototype in front of users and listening to feedback.

Day 1: Defining the challenge

The first day allowed us to reframe the problem we were trying to solve. So, our week-long sprint goal was to build a simple, intuitive app for booking appointments for anyone registered with a GP in England. With this in mind we created ‘how might we’ questions, and turned problems into opportunities by asking questions such as:

  • How might we help people get the help they need, more quickly, so they can lead happier and healthier lives?
  • How might we be open and transparent about the process of booking appointments?
  • How might we update people about their appointment?

Working in this way encouraged everyone involved to see the bigger picture. It helped us think about our end goal and why we want to achieve it. Zooming out like this also helped keep us on track for the rest of the sprint when there’s a focus on detail.

Day 2: Sketching ideas

photo of team sketching on day 2

When it came to sketching out ideas for possible solutions to the ‘how might we’ questions, we used the ‘4-part sketch method’. It guides team members through note-taking and generating 8 rough ideas through to a ‘solution sketch’ – something slightly more carefully thought-out. Importantly, it asks that people work alone at this stage.

We found this really beneficial because when you’re working with people you don’t necessarily often work with, it can be intimidating. Working alone and then sharing ideas anonymously avoided extraverts and ‘leaders’ grabbing the most air time and encouraged more confident participation from quieter team members because they knew their ideas would later be seen and heard.  

The solution sketches included chatbots; statistics dashboards and smart reminders as well as the use of video to explain complex processes and ideas that use artificial intelligence.

The next step was to choose which of these ideas we’d take forward into the rest of the sprint.

Day 3: Choosing and idea and storyboarding

photo of storyboards - lots of post it notes

On decision day, we put the solution sketches on the wall for everyone to see. The ideas were so wide-ranging which shows the importance of including colleagues from different business areas. It highlighted that we all have different priorities, but explaining our sketch solutions helped everyone understand where those priorities come from.

Using stickers, we flagged anything that aligned to our sprint goal which made it easier to see where or if we could merge different ideas. We then did a ‘speed critique’ which involved an impartial person talking through an idea that wasn’t theirs – it helped make sure everyone’s ideas were viewed equally.

Settling on one idea

photo of the chosen idea's storyboard

After a vote, the team decided to combine ideas around organising different types of appointments, smart reminders and linking repeat prescriptions and appointments. This is what we’d take forward to prototype, but first we created a storyboard –  a visual map of the user journey.

Day 4: Prototyping

photograph of 4 of the team prototyping

The next day we brought the storyboard idea to life by creating a working prototype. Working in this way allowed us to quickly create something which we could place in front of users the following day to get their feedback.

These images show how reminders might work in the app.

screenshot of the reminder in the app prototype

Day 5: Getting feedback from users

photo of user research participant's hand and mobile phone using the app prototype

On the final day of the sprint we put the prototype in front of potential users. We held 5 sessions in the Federation user research lab, and we visited 1 participant who had accessibility issues in their home.

Here are some of the things we learnt from the research:

  1. People don’t just manage their own health, they book appointments for children, parents or grandparents too.
  2. A big pain point in the process of making an appointment is waiting (particularly waiting on the phone for half an hour) Any way we can reduce the time spent on managing / booking the better.
  3. People often have a preference about things like whether they see a male or female doctor, or their appointment time (for example, on their lunch break). Allowing people choice is important.
  4. People were very positive about appointment reminders. They felt they helped them manage their health better.
  5. Our service needs to be reliable with no technical issues. If there are issues a person is less likely to use a service like ours again and revert back to non-digital methods.

What’s next

We’ll be feeding what we’ve learnt back into the design process and improving the prototype. Now the app is live we’re also gathering customer feedback & seeing what the pain points are we need to work on next.

And we’ll continue to work closely with stakeholders because their expertise have been invaluable.

Lucy Tallon
User researcher

You can read more about the Co-op health’s proposed work.

Using ‘sacrificial concepts’ to explore the direction of a product

Yesterday, the design team held a show and tell to discuss 2 questions:

  1. What is design?
  2. Why should you care?

Everyone was welcome but if you couldn’t make it, we’re writing up some of the examples from different areas of design that we talked about. We’ll post them on the blog this week. They’ll be aimed at Co-op colleagues whose expertise are in something other than a digital discipline.

First up: product exploration in the digital offers team.

Exploring the desirability, feasibility and viability of digital offers for members

In September last year we posted an update about our work around digital offers. In summary, we want to create personalised, paper-free offers for Co-op members. We think it will save money for them and create value for the Co-op.

Start somewhere: the format we tried first

We allowed a trial group of 6000 members to choose and use digital offers. Every Monday for 6 weeks, each of these members received 8 personalised offers based on their transaction history. Using our website or app, they could choose to add 2 of those 8 offers to their membership card so that when they swiped their membership card at the till, the offers were applied to their shopping.

At this point, we’d established that giving members digital offers in this way was technically possible which was great news. However, we didn’t know whether giving members a choice of 2 offers from 8, once a week, on a Monday was best for them and/ or good for the business. Would choosing 1 offer from 4 be better for them? For us? How about new offers every 2 weeks? How could we give members an enjoyable experience that would keep members using offers?

Ultimately, we wanted to increase their visits to Co-op food stores and nudge them to consider products that they might normally purchase from another retailer.

Our next piece of work was to find out how we might do this.

Exploring potential product directions through ‘sacrificial concepts’

We looked at the different ways we could give members personalised offers that could cultivate continued, enjoyable use.

‘Sacrificial concepts’, a method developed by design company IDEO, helped us gain insight into customers’ beliefs and behaviour. Here’s an example of a handful of sacrificial concepts that we put in front of a small group of members we visited in their own homes.

slide shows a range of sketches or what we refer to as 'sacrificial concepts'

They’re sketches of ideas.

They’re not presented in the context of a computer or device screen as we might do with designs that already have a substantial amount of research behind them. They’re just ideas, they’re abstract and open to interpretation because we put them in front of potential users to provoke conversation.

The sketches above helped us elicit honest feedback about offers, shopping and their interactions with the Co-op.

Cheap and quick feedback through sacrificial concepts

We wanted to quickly and cheaply test a few ideas with potential users.

Screen Shot 2019-03-12 at 15.39.43

Existing research suggests uncertainty and mystery motivates people. Would revealing an offer affect a member’s perception of it?

The feedback we heard gave us confidence that there was something appealing about this mechanic: it seemed to peak people’s curiosity. They found it exciting.

We know that people are influenced by social groups and communities. How would voting and social participation affect their interaction with the product?

Screen Shot 2019-03-12 at 15.40.02

The feedback we heard here was that this idea simply didn’t fit with how members plan their shopping. They didn’t plan their meals far enough ahead to know what they would want a week later.

We were also wanted to find out whether the way we presented the information about how much money members saved by using offers might affect their enjoyment. We explored whether there were any opportunities in terms of how we could show members the value of their offers.

Screen Shot 2019-03-12 at 15.40.13

The feedback we heard from some people was that they were more interested in savings in the context of their bank, not a specific retailer. But it was interesting to see how members reacted to us reframing the amount saved, so we learnt that there may be potential in this idea but it shouldn’t be the first thing we build.

What the sacrificial concepts told us

We took everything from the concept cards that we felt had potential and incorporated them into a prototype to put in front of members. This time, our designs had the research from the sacrificial concepts behind them but at this point, nothing was built in code. We used the prototype to get more feedback so we can iterate and improve for our members.

We’ve now identified 3 potential features for Co-op members digital offers. We’ll test them with larger volumes of users in May this year and we’ll listen to their feedback and make small improvements regularly.

The benefits of this technique

We started off with a lot of ideas and directions and through talking to potential users we’ve be able to quickly and cheaply ‘sacrifice’ the concepts that our research identified as having little potential. We’re left with the things we have a good idea will meet the needs of our members or at the very least are appealing to them.

If everyone shares an understanding of the benefits of being design-led, it’ll be easier for experts from around the business to work together to deliver value to Co-op customers, colleagues and the Co-op as a business. If you didn’t make the show and tell but would like to find out more, email Katherine Wastell, Head of Design.

Louise Nicholas, lead product designer
Joel Godfrey, product manager

What is design, and why should you care?

Today the Co-op Digital design team held a 90-minute show and tell to address 2 questions:

  1. What is design?
  2. Why should you care?

3 posters. each one is red and has white and green copy that says: what is design and why should you care?

Like all show and tells, this one was open to everyone. We wanted to give Co-op colleagues whose expertise are outside digital disciplines the opportunity to find out how the design process works. If everyone shares an understanding of the benefits of being design-led, it’ll be easier for experts from around the business to work together to deliver value to Co-op customers, colleagues and the Co-op as a business.

orange card with black copy that says: we're in this together. making good products is everyone's responsibility

We need people from all areas of expertise to work together if we want to make successful products and services.

In the show and tell we talked about:

  • why design-led companies perform better
  • what service design is and how it aligns user needs with business goals
  • how the design process begins with research, before testing and iterating and testing again
  • the importance of designing products that meet people’s behaviour, and grow according to market and behavioural shifts
  • why we need to focus on the outcome of design, not the way things look
  • the difference between functional design and playful visual design and when to use each one

Showing examples of design

We also used the session to pull out examples of design at Co-op Digital from the past year. User researchers, content and interaction designers talked about:

  • product exploration in Co-op digital offers
  • content design and pair writing when designing How do I
  • field research for Co-op Guardian
  • service mapping in Co-op car insurance
  • proposition testing and design sprints in Co-op Food e-commerce
  • one Co-op online and the design system

We’ll post about some of these examples later this week.

Co-design is everyone’s responsibility

We need people from all areas of expertise to work together if we want to make successful products and services.

Thank you to everyone who came along. We appreciate your time. If you didn’t make it today but would like to find out more, email me.

Katherine Wastell
Head of Design

What we mean when we talk about service design at the Co-op

I wanted to write this post to explain what service design is at the Co-op. Service design helps build more inclusive teams as well as products and services that meet user and business needs.

What we mean when we say ‘services’

To understand what service design is, we need to understand what a service is. A ‘service’ is something that helps someone complete a task, like finding information or getting something done.

At the Co-op we help our customers do lots of things, for example, we help them:

We also help our colleagues. For example, we help:

  • Food colleagues find out how to do something in stores through the How do I? website   
  • Funeralcare colleagues spend more time face-to-face time with bereaved families and less on admin through Co-op Guardian
  • Food colleagues check information about when they’re due to work with the Shifts website

These are just some of the services within the Co-op. Some of them are customer-facing, some are colleague-facing, some include elements of both. Some tasks can only be completed online, some can be done entirely offline, but most will include a mix of both.

Service design at the Co-op

And that’s what service design is at the Co-op: it’s designing the sequence of interactions a user has with us. It’s a holistic approach which considers the end-to-end experience, online and offline.

A Co-op service begins the first time a potential customer interacts with us (whether that be online or coming into one of our stores), or at the point a colleague is asked to sign up to one of our online services. The service goes right through to them achieving what they set out to do.  

Digital teams can’t design services alone

In Co-op Digital we refer to service design constantly, but we don’t own it.

Service design includes colleagues from all around the organisation – those from legal teams, marketing teams, colleagues in customer-facing roles, as well as those who speak with customers from our call centre. And everyone in between too.

We cannot design good services that meet the need of our users without the expertise from around the organisation.

Mapping out the service to see the big picture

When we design or iterate a service, we map out each interaction, by each type of user, chronologically. This is service mapping.

We try to understand a customer’s mindset when they come to use a service. What task do they want to complete? For us to design an experience that meets their needs we need to know where they’ve come from, why they’re here, and what they’re here to do.

Service maps:

  • show the whole user experience, visually
  • join up multiple user interactions and channels, beyond digital
  • show the end-to-end experience from awareness through to completing a task

An inclusive way of working

We have walls dedicated to service mapping which we update to reflect anything that has an impact on the service, like if we’ve learnt something new in user research or if the business strategy changes. We map services openly like this so that everyone can see what’s been worked on.

Service maps help teams work better because they:

  • align product teams around a shared understanding of their users’ journeys
  • communicate the user journey to stakeholders
  • help everybody see problems at a glance
  • help the team empathise with the journey their users are on
  • allow anyone to contribute their knowledge of how a service works, or ideas to help improve it with a post it
  • put research and data into the context of the wider service

Photograph of the pharmacy service map and the team and stakeholders crowding round

This photo shows our pharmacy ‘blueprint’ (a type of service map) created by Louise Nicholas and Derek Harvie. It maps the stages of the service, and customer interactions and operational touch points.

photograph of illustration by Jack Fletcher of a Membership storyboard illustrates customer interactions throughout the service, online and offline.

This is Jack Fletcher’s Membership storyboard which illustrates customer interactions throughout the service, online and offline.

A way to make better decisions

User research helps us identify problems. Highlighting them on a service map within the context of a user journey gives us a visual prompt about where we should focus our efforts. Being able to see problems, clearly, helps us prioritise what we need to improve.

Service design also helps us see where operational inefficiencies are and therefore where we can prioritise commercial gain – business goals are as important as user needs.

We use service maps to make better decisions because they help us:

  • highlight pain points and problems
  • spot gaps in our knowledge and the service itself
  • find opportunities to improve the experience
  • raise business inefficiencies
  • prioritise what we should try and fix first
  • pivot as a business to focus on the right things for our customers, members and business

photograph of Store Hub service map designed by Kathryn Grace

Here’s the Food business’s ‘Store Hub’ service map designed by Kathryn Grace. It shows the reality of how colleagues in stores use systems and processes.

We need everyone’s knowledge and expertise

For it to be effective, the whole team should participate in service design. At least initially, a designer will lead the work, but the whole team needs to contribute for it to work. In a discovery, service design will shape how your service needs to work. In later phases, it should inform iterations and strategic direction.

For anyone working at Co-op, the research, content and design teams will be hosting a showcase of our ways of working on Monday 10 December. Come along if you’re interested in finding out more about service design, all welcome. Location to be announced.

Katherine Wastell

Head of Design

Introducing local.co.uk – Co-op’s new marketplace

We’ve recently launched local.co.uk – a marketplace that connects independent businesses to customers across the UK. We’re doing this because we want to give small businesses a fairer way to trade and help make communities across the UK stronger.

We built the service in 13 weeks and we’re proud of what we’ve achieved. But we know it’s far from perfect – there are parts of the service that could be smoother and features that we want to improve and introduce.

We launched it when we did so that we could learn quickly from real users and make the service valuable for them.

We’ve done a lot and learnt a lot.

This video shows how we created local.co.uk (2 minutes 26 seconds)