Using ‘sacrificial concepts’ to explore the direction of a product

Yesterday, the design team held a show and tell to discuss 2 questions:

  1. What is design?
  2. Why should you care?

Everyone was welcome but if you couldn’t make it, we’re writing up some of the examples from different areas of design that we talked about. We’ll post them on the blog this week. They’ll be aimed at Co-op colleagues whose expertise are in something other than a digital discipline.

First up: product exploration in the digital offers team.

Exploring the desirability, feasibility and viability of digital offers for members

In September last year we posted an update about our work around digital offers. In summary, we want to create personalised, paper-free offers for Co-op members. We think it will save money for them and create value for the Co-op.

Start somewhere: the format we tried first

We allowed a trial group of 6000 members to choose and use digital offers. Every Monday for 6 weeks, each of these members received 8 personalised offers based on their transaction history. Using our website or app, they could choose to add 2 of those 8 offers to their membership card so that when they swiped their membership card at the till, the offers were applied to their shopping.

At this point, we’d established that giving members digital offers in this way was technically possible which was great news. However, we didn’t know whether giving members a choice of 2 offers from 8, once a week, on a Monday was best for them and/ or good for the business. Would choosing 1 offer from 4 be better for them? For us? How about new offers every 2 weeks? How could we give members an enjoyable experience that would keep members using offers?

Ultimately, we wanted to increase their visits to Co-op food stores and nudge them to consider products that they might normally purchase from another retailer.

Our next piece of work was to find out how we might do this.

Exploring potential product directions through ‘sacrificial concepts’

We looked at the different ways we could give members personalised offers that could cultivate continued, enjoyable use.

‘Sacrificial concepts’, a method developed by design company IDEO, helped us gain insight into customers’ beliefs and behaviour. Here’s an example of a handful of sacrificial concepts that we put in front of a small group of members we visited in their own homes.

slide shows a range of sketches or what we refer to as 'sacrificial concepts'

They’re sketches of ideas.

They’re not presented in the context of a computer or device screen as we might do with designs that already have a substantial amount of research behind them. They’re just ideas, they’re abstract and open to interpretation because we put them in front of potential users to provoke conversation.

The sketches above helped us elicit honest feedback about offers, shopping and their interactions with the Co-op.

Cheap and quick feedback through sacrificial concepts

We wanted to quickly and cheaply test a few ideas with potential users.

Screen Shot 2019-03-12 at 15.39.43

Existing research suggests uncertainty and mystery motivates people. Would revealing an offer affect a member’s perception of it?

The feedback we heard gave us confidence that there was something appealing about this mechanic: it seemed to peak people’s curiosity. They found it exciting.

We know that people are influenced by social groups and communities. How would voting and social participation affect their interaction with the product?

Screen Shot 2019-03-12 at 15.40.02

The feedback we heard here was that this idea simply didn’t fit with how members plan their shopping. They didn’t plan their meals far enough ahead to know what they would want a week later.

We were also wanted to find out whether the way we presented the information about how much money members saved by using offers might affect their enjoyment. We explored whether there were any opportunities in terms of how we could show members the value of their offers.

Screen Shot 2019-03-12 at 15.40.13

The feedback we heard from some people was that they were more interested in savings in the context of their bank, not a specific retailer. But it was interesting to see how members reacted to us reframing the amount saved, so we learnt that there may be potential in this idea but it shouldn’t be the first thing we build.

What the sacrificial concepts told us

We took everything from the concept cards that we felt had potential and incorporated them into a prototype to put in front of members. This time, our designs had the research from the sacrificial concepts behind them but at this point, nothing was built in code. We used the prototype to get more feedback so we can iterate and improve for our members.

We’ve now identified 3 potential features for Co-op members digital offers. We’ll test them with larger volumes of users in May this year and we’ll listen to their feedback and make small improvements regularly.

The benefits of this technique

We started off with a lot of ideas and directions and through talking to potential users we’ve be able to quickly and cheaply ‘sacrifice’ the concepts that our research identified as having little potential. We’re left with the things we have a good idea will meet the needs of our members or at the very least are appealing to them.

If everyone shares an understanding of the benefits of being design-led, it’ll be easier for experts from around the business to work together to deliver value to Co-op customers, colleagues and the Co-op as a business. If you didn’t make the show and tell but would like to find out more, email Katherine Wastell, Head of Design.

Louise Nicholas, lead product designer
Joel Godfrey, product manager