Co-op health: running a design sprint across disciplines

Last week we launched an app that helps people view, order and manage their NHS repeat prescription from their phone. We want to make prescription ordering easy and convenient for people by providing self-service, simple collection and delivery options, and transparency throughout the process.

The app is very much a first version that we’ll continue to test with users and iterate on.

However, we think this is a good opportunity to talk about the work we did on a feature that we hope to add to the app soon.

Trying out a 5-day design sprint

As with many big, traditional organisations it can sometimes be difficult to move at pace within the Co-op. Design sprints can be useful to answer critical business questions quickly so we thought we’d give it a go. We got a group of designers, researchers, engineers, pharmacists, product managers as well as subject matter experts together for 5 consecutive days to build a realistic prototype. Having the relevant people in the room who could make decisions on behalf of their area of expertise was essential.

Design sprint: booking medical appointments

During the design sprint we were looking at how people book an appointment with a medical professional.

Together, we spent a day on each of the following tasks:

  1. Defining the challenge.
  2. Sketching ideas that might help us solve the challenge.
  3. Choosing an idea to take forward, then storyboarding it.
  4. Designing a prototype of the chosen idea.
  5. Putting the prototype in front of users and listening to feedback.

Day 1: Defining the challenge

The first day allowed us to reframe the problem we were trying to solve. So, our week-long sprint goal was to build a simple, intuitive app for booking appointments for anyone registered with a GP in England. With this in mind we created ‘how might we’ questions, and turned problems into opportunities by asking questions such as:

  • How might we help people get the help they need, more quickly, so they can lead happier and healthier lives?
  • How might we be open and transparent about the process of booking appointments?
  • How might we update people about their appointment?

Working in this way encouraged everyone involved to see the bigger picture. It helped us think about our end goal and why we want to achieve it. Zooming out like this also helped keep us on track for the rest of the sprint when there’s a focus on detail.

Day 2: Sketching ideas

photo of team sketching on day 2

When it came to sketching out ideas for possible solutions to the ‘how might we’ questions, we used the ‘4-part sketch method’. It guides team members through note-taking and generating 8 rough ideas through to a ‘solution sketch’ – something slightly more carefully thought-out. Importantly, it asks that people work alone at this stage.

We found this really beneficial because when you’re working with people you don’t necessarily often work with, it can be intimidating. Working alone and then sharing ideas anonymously avoided extraverts and ‘leaders’ grabbing the most air time and encouraged more confident participation from quieter team members because they knew their ideas would later be seen and heard.  

The solution sketches included chatbots; statistics dashboards and smart reminders as well as the use of video to explain complex processes and ideas that use artificial intelligence.

The next step was to choose which of these ideas we’d take forward into the rest of the sprint.

Day 3: Choosing and idea and storyboarding

photo of storyboards - lots of post it notes

On decision day, we put the solution sketches on the wall for everyone to see. The ideas were so wide-ranging which shows the importance of including colleagues from different business areas. It highlighted that we all have different priorities, but explaining our sketch solutions helped everyone understand where those priorities come from.

Using stickers, we flagged anything that aligned to our sprint goal which made it easier to see where or if we could merge different ideas. We then did a ‘speed critique’ which involved an impartial person talking through an idea that wasn’t theirs – it helped make sure everyone’s ideas were viewed equally.

Settling on one idea

photo of the chosen idea's storyboard

After a vote, the team decided to combine ideas around organising different types of appointments, smart reminders and linking repeat prescriptions and appointments. This is what we’d take forward to prototype, but first we created a storyboard –  a visual map of the user journey.

Day 4: Prototyping

photograph of 4 of the team prototyping

The next day we brought the storyboard idea to life by creating a working prototype. Working in this way allowed us to quickly create something which we could place in front of users the following day to get their feedback.

These images show how reminders might work in the app.

screenshot of the reminder in the app prototype

Day 5: Getting feedback from users

photo of user research participant's hand and mobile phone using the app prototype

On the final day of the sprint we put the prototype in front of potential users. We held 5 sessions in the Federation user research lab, and we visited 1 participant who had accessibility issues in their home.

Here are some of the things we learnt from the research:

  1. People don’t just manage their own health, they book appointments for children, parents or grandparents too.
  2. A big pain point in the process of making an appointment is waiting (particularly waiting on the phone for half an hour) Any way we can reduce the time spent on managing / booking the better.
  3. People often have a preference about things like whether they see a male or female doctor, or their appointment time (for example, on their lunch break). Allowing people choice is important.
  4. People were very positive about appointment reminders. They felt they helped them manage their health better.
  5. Our service needs to be reliable with no technical issues. If there are issues a person is less likely to use a service like ours again and revert back to non-digital methods.

What’s next

We’ll be feeding what we’ve learnt back into the design process and improving the prototype. Now the app is live we’re also gathering customer feedback & seeing what the pain points are we need to work on next.

And we’ll continue to work closely with stakeholders because their expertise have been invaluable.

Lucy Tallon
User researcher

You can read more about the Co-op health’s proposed work.

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